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What did 2018 teach the data centre community?

Posted by on January 3, 2019
Internet of Things concept. Wireless Communication Network. Information Communication Technology. abstract image visual.

2018 it will be reflected on as a year in which the technological community was given a strong reminder what is at risk when handling customer data. The introduction of GDPR in May has now set a standard in how to keep information private which cannot be underestimated or overlooked. But what has this year meant for data centres? Here are the three things we’ve learned.

Firstly, adiabatic cooling technology has come into its own over the last 12 months. While this technology has been used for quite some time, it is an essential element to running environmentally friendly data centres, and a record-breaking UK and European summer gave it prominence in the media and industry alike. The technology can reduce water usage by up to 20% and this will be vital for data centres in years to come. Businesses are investing wisely in their data solutions, with stakeholders keen to have a firm grip control over costs, improve energy efficiency and manage the growing extremes in weather temperatures.

Secondly, adiabatic cooling is not the only innovation being adopted by data centre providers to improve efficiencies. Along with specialist partners, many are developing resourceful and environmentally friendly solutions. For instance, it was recently revealed that Fujitsu is investing in a zero-emissions data centre, using a wind turbine as its energy source.

As modern businesses and consumers become more reliant on technology and organisations keep one eye on improving efficiencies, what could 2019 have in store? If you ask Intel, data centres aren’t going away anytime soon, so it is vital providers keep them relevant to forward-thinking business leaders.

Thirdly, governments are both being pressured, and are in turn pressuring corporations, to reduce their carbon footprints, so will we see wider adoption of wind turbines to power data centres? Or perhaps there will be an increase in the implementation of machine learning?

With 2019 now in full swing, there are technologies emerging that will play a big part in the efficient and effective running of data centres next year – and beyond. Data centres are, at their heart, what makes the exciting aspects of digital transformation, like cloud computing, possible. It is important for providers keep innovating and ensure this remains the case.